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francisco has a substantial interest to promote in compliance with the youth sales law in protecting our children from illegally obtaining tobacco. so just the background of why this law exists. there is a lot of laws that exist, and one that i would really like to highlight is you see the old time law book here is the reason that a retailer if a clerk sells to a minor they get a ticket and it is issued a ticket and a fine that is associated with it and it is for code 308 and a violation of a law that you cannot provide tobacco to a person under 18 years of age. and this is a new law? no. you see this book, it is actually from 1906. so the code, 308 you cannot provide tobacco to a minor, and it has been on the books i think from maybe the 1880s or something, but it was in the 1906 version for your interest. there are a lot of laws that have taken effect since then that reinforce the idea that it is illegal to sell to minors. so, these slides, i cannot necessarily read, but, many members of our comment can, the reason that we put these on is that we understand that many people who work i
's, liver, livelihood, lover or the law. those 4 things. liver, livelihood, lover and law. within those l's is when somebody shows up in my door, someone suffering, a family member suffering who brings somebody in. when it company ms to treat we know there is different types of treatment, there is evidence base treatment. there is good evidence for it, we do it. there is evidence free treatment, there is no evidence whatsoever and there is evidence proof treatment. one of those evidence proof treatment is incarceration treatment. there was an office inspection in general report and eventually matt case became supervisor for it. i have been involved in other places. treatment in custody doesn't work. flash incarceration does not work. as far as the treatment that do work for alcoholism, alcoholism is a chronic disease like diabetes. hypertension and emphysema. when we look at outcomes for chronic disease, a landmark study for the journal medical association in 1999, showed that results for treatments were no worse or better than any other chronic disease model. so treatment of alcoholism
really act as a good communicator and facilitator in the program from a law enforcement background. and the grant we get through public works really allows us to run effectively. >> great, thank you. >> [speaker not understood]. let me come on over here. what's your question? >> okay. [speaker not understood]. i've gotten three years of knowledge [speaker not understood]. my question is this. how am i going to get the police department, how am i going to get city council -- they're partially on board, but some of our people in public works are here today. how can i convey to them that i'm not a nut -- everybody here thinks i'm a nut because [speaker not understood]. how did they really take this seriously and realize that graffiti is a crime and it requires money and it requires attention from the officials, not just from covering graffiti? is there an answer? can you give me some sort of -- what's a good direction? >> [speaker not understood]. >> [speaker not understood]. basically the task force, they'll put together and try to convince the citizens something is happening, then i
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
it but they choose to move it a block and a half up. and dpw's application of the laws is arbitrary and mr. hwang said that it is 300 feet away and how could that be, they are doing something weird. >> thank you, next speaker please. >> hi, my name is keith, and i am not affiliated with any business in the neighborhood. impart of the neighborhood in the sense that i walk and drive those blocks frequently to get from the financial district to my facility. i know that you don't make policy decisions but this is public comment but i will note that the last thing that this block needs is another coffee per vaier particularly a truck that blocks the sidewalk, and it can con gest the traffic further. i am happy to know that there are things that you could deny this application and i hope that you do, you know, pay attention to what you are going to do and hopefully at the end of the day this application will not be allowed to exist, thank you very much. >> next speaker please? >> hi, i'm gary, i'm the applicant. i have gotten no rest in 15 calls from the department of public health over the last week.
perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i
proper and this project will be built in accordance with the law that will be scrutinized as it has been for six years now. it will meet the stand standards of the code and mr. santos is here to talk about issues but you have three minutes and come up. >> in terms of the engineering issues but this will be a better, safer situation once this project is built. >> commissioners, santos, (inaudible) for the project. stability of the site, we are proposing absolutely the best thing that can happen to this hill. why? one, we are going to take all of the water and create a permanent new watering system, so all of the drainage issues that are occurring on the adjacent properties have been solved by the fact that we are taking that excavation. two, we will have retaining walls that are properly designed and properly reinforced and more importantly they will be peer reviewed and we will have another pair of eyes and structural engineers and source engineer and geologists this is the best possible thing that could happen to the hill and stabilized and let's talk about the demolition. mr. will
'm going home and there is people all the time up in there educating myself about the law, i know is fast to get in there, but when the wheels are turned to come home, it's slow. i couldn't accept it. people are like they are going to do this to time. i said no, this is clear. this was what was supposed to have been done from the beginning. even my families, my loved wupz ones that lost. that made me fight more. i never gate gave up my fate. my hope is restored. >> with that i would like to thank all of our panelist. thank you. [ applause ] and we are now going to move to our second panel. while they take their seats, this idea of forced treatment versus constitutional rights has always been a tension that we've had in our criminal justice system. there is an issue that came up earlier this year that you may have read about involving this implementation of a court that was supposed to treat individuals who were suffering from long-term alcoholism. and the court was set up in a way where individuals were not being arrested for a crime but instead were being jailed for contempt of court a
're confident that both history and the law will be on their side. telling us today they feel a ruling is not only critical for same-sex couples looking for equal rights, but also for the next generation. >> they don't have to worry about being second-class citizens growing up. >>> also today, a group of influential doctors endorsed same-sex marriage. the american academy of pediatrics said it's in the best interests of children offering children long-term security, rights and benefits. the doctors made the declaration after four years of analysis and research. >>> the 20-year-old woman who said she was a rape victim last month at uc santa cruz has been officially charged with making a false report. she reported she was beaten and raped on campus in a mid afternoon attack. they stepped up police patrols, public meetings and an 11-day investigation. triplet had bruises on her body that day but investigators haven't discovered how she got them. >>> two oakland city council members, they say, illegally interfered with the bidding process of a major construction contract. they accuse them
in this case and said that they are meeting the letter of the law. so we are going by what is shown on the plans. certainly the board of appeals here in its hearing on this matter and considering all of the facts can consider items in that article and can consider the testimony by all of the parties here in making a decision. we are basing our decision on the plans that are given to us and that are there testifying to and this is what we are going to do and this is what they are going to build and that is what we are expecting them to build if they don't build that and if they exceed the scope, then we will have to review that and come in for a revision permit and may trigger the 317 requirement. >> and in your experience, in the planning department when you see the designs such as this one and you have the evidence that has been presented to us today, understanding what sort of the spirit of the law as well as the technical components and requirements of it, is this something that is of concern to the planning department? where we see the people, i mean, at least from my, what i am
. in 2010, federal judge walker struck it down saying it violated the equal protection under the law. in a split decision, a three-judge panel of the circuit court of appeals upheld that ruling last february. setting the stage before the u.s. supreme court. this past valentine's day, gay couples demanded marriage licenses at san francisco city hall as they have every year since 2004. they were turned away. >> it affects us in so many ways in our every day life. what we want is to be treated fairly. >> scott: i spoke with lieutenant governor gavin newsom recently about what compelled him to take a leading role in the gay marriage debate nine years ago. >> thanks for having me. >> scott: take us back to 2004. the marriage licenses began to be issued in san francisco. you had just gotten into office. what got into you? >> i went to the state of the union. nancy pelosi made a terrible mistake by giving me her husband's ticket to watch the state of the union. i was listening to the issues of the day. abstinence and drug testing. he would fulfill his private commitments now made public to
to implement lawyer's law which consist of outpatient treatment. it was named after laura wilcox, a mental health worker who had been shot to death by a man who refused treatment. the county r remains the only county to implement the law. there have been other counties in los angeles county and other counties who are considering it. >> why have they not adopted the law. what is it about forced treatment and the consequences for an allowing refusing treatment. we have a panel who have a knowledge of this subject in some cases because of their professional endeavors and in some cases because of personal experiences and in some cases, both. let me introduce them. karen chen is an attorney manager for the san francisco public defenders office, kathy, whose son battled mental illness, can is a subject treatment expert for the medical center. danny is the associate director for the serial neeb breet program for the city of san diego. and san francisco chief of police. gary is a psychiatrist and laura's law advocate and eduardo vega of the mental health association of san francisco. let me start
. >> they will be mindful of the limited role as judges to interpret existing law. >> plus, legal analysis on how the issues might be viewed on the highest court in the land. stay tuned for the special coverage of gay marriage before the u.s. supreme court. captioning by vitac, underwritten by fireman's fund >>> good evening. i'm scott shafer. welcome to this week in northern california. next tuesday, more than four years after california voters approved proposition 8, the state's ban on same-sex marriage, it gets a hearing from the u.s. supreme court. it will hear arguments for the defense of marriage act known as doma. we discuss the issues before the u.s. supreme court. it's the final stop on a long and winding legal road. let's begin with a look at how it all started. the week of valentine's day, 2004, newly elected san francisco mayor gavin newsom, boldly, some said recklessly orders to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples. >> we reignited a fundamental debate. >> scott: outside city hall, gays and lesbians lines up around the block. about 4,000 couples tied the knot. it was not to last. at the
to him. there was no indication he was going to kill a law enforcement officer. >>> judge agreed to resign. 58-year-old judge paul seeman is accused of stealing a million and a half dollars from his neighbor. ktvu channel 2 news was the first to report this story. he has been on leave since he was arrested last june but he continued to get his salary. he is facing 32 felony charges, 12 counts of perjury, elder theft and grand theft and unauthorized disclosure of information. >>> vacant store fronts are a problem for san jose. ktvu's robert handa is in downtown where a quick fix could pave the way to a permanent solution there. robert? >> reporter: that's right. we are at a building that is usually empty but as you can see it is bustling. this activity is part of san jose's plan to get rid of the economic and image related problems that come with vacant buildings. >> reporter: the chef is whipping up dishes for a crowd of people in downtown san jose. this stretch doesn't usually see much traffic because of all the vacant buildings so today they launched start up san jose, to attra
which he fought for so long in the justice. the decision was law of the land. equal justice under law. >> when a supreme court decided the gideon case, they really brought light to that phrase. it doesn't matter if you are rich, it doesn't matter if you are poor, you get the same equal chance. >> just look at what happened to gideon. the supreme court didn't set gideon free but it gave him a fair trial with a competent attorney. >> not guilty. >> clarence earl gideon was a free man. the man who won a landmark supreme court case went to live a normal living with a job pumping gas. >> when i read where it says equal justice under law, i'm very inspired by that. i'm very comforted by that. but i know a lot of people are treated unfairly. i see it as something encouraging but i don't see it yet. >> it's written into constitution and established into the goal for society to reach for and live up to. people will fall short, rights can be ignored or even trampled. with nothing more than a pencil and knowledge. >> if you know your rights you can protect your rights. if you don't know your r
emerging to watch, she's also graduated from georgetown university law center and practicing attorney and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of operating a training center for public defenders and he did. he's no now the president and founder and one of the contributors to gideon's army, he's from john marshall law school where he teaches law and criminal procedure. he was in the post katrina and new orleans center. he trained people in the film. he received an advocacy fellowship and named a public interest fellow by harvard law school. next we have maurice call well. he was convicted in the housing project here in san francisco. there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime yet he was still convicted based on the false testimony of a single neighbor. he was sentence to life behind bars. in prison mr. colwell contacted the center for help and located two witnesses who saw the murder and said mr. colwell was not involved in anyway. they located the re
it the law of the land you can't discriminate in the area of marriage. >> u.s. solicitor general will have a final 10 minutes or och sigs. he represents the president and will likely be asked about mr. obama's shift to support same-sex marriage. a key justice to watch will be justice anthony ken neddy. he has been a strong degrernd of gay rights and a champion of state ri.s he could be the swing vote. the court could dismiss the case for want of standing which would allow same-sex marriages in california. the court could rule prop 8 is unconstitutional, it could threaten similar bans in other states or could leave prop 8 in place ruling states have the right to decide for themselves. the 9th circuits decision states voters didn't have the right to take away the freedom california supreme court already granted. coming up at 6:00 state attorney general will weigh in along with one of the berkeley women who is one of the plaintiffs in this case. a quick correction. i said prop 8 vote was 2004. it was 2008. on california voters ban same-sex marriage in the state. reporting from the newsroom ab
campbell? that's good. those of you who don't, especially if you're in law enforce. you're probably going to want to write this down. no graph.net. randy campbell has been working in graffiti cases forever and he's a retired, i think, sheriff or highway patrolman. maybe somebody can help me out there. >> highway patrol. >> highway patrolman. what he runs it's no ground.net. for law enforcement, if you're looking for a tagger you think is crossing state boundaries and you catch one and you want to put up that person's tag to other law enforcement agencies, he's got a network where you can do that. so, you send that in to him, he sends it out and it goes to hundreds of cities. if you're looking for somebody and you think that other cities might know who that is, put that out and he'll send it out to all those cities. so, e-mail him and get on his network. he's got a website. and he's a great resource for law enforcement specifically and everybody else, too, but law enforcement specifically to help you find graffiti vandals or to add on to cases if you do find a graffiti vandal. so, this is
a leading role in a decision to challenge voter id laws in texas and south carolina that could restrict minority voting rights. >>> several protesters and postal workers gathered in front of the national postal forum in san francisco today. many are upset about the postal service letting go of jobs and even closing post offices. ktvu's brian flores is outside one of the historic post offices slated to close with both sides of the controversy. good afternoon brian. >> reporter: good afternoon, tori. many postal workers say they are upset because their livelihoods are in danger, not only their jobs or pay may be reduced but historical post offices may close. meantime postal officials have attended the conference to generate new business despite paying millions of dollars to attend. >> but it must say important. >> speaking in front of hundreds of postal vendors, postmaster general patrick donahoe is looking toward technology to lead the postal service in the future. >> we think there is still plenty of growth opportunities because it's the most direct
to hear those words. this is not to give the law- enforcement a short shrift. i have had an impact on my husband's life, some of the unwanted. but he has had an impact on mind. i have done extensive work with law enforcement, with the lapd and the los angeles county sheriff's. i am here to tell you that crime has been driven down in los angeles because of their efforts, but not only because of their efforts. so what does the collaboration look like. i want you to keep some ideas in mind. there is no first among equals. what we learned in los angeles was that oppression alone was not the answer. it did not work. there were record highs in gang violence in 2005. i want to tell you what has happened between 2005 and 2012. number one, the grass roots -- the disorganize, fragmented, passionate grass roots must be part of this. the community members who go to county supervisors meetings, the members who pass out fliers, the youths who have been in the juvenile justice system that are now part of the coalition -- those individuals must have a seat at the table. no. 2. community-based organizati
and law enforcement can work together on measures that will ensure that certain operators are being a bit more responsible because that creates an issue for everyone else and i think that is where i hope that we go. >> anything else? and by the way, i think who knew that three harvard law grads would be so interested in this issue. i think that is president chiu noted that. >> is there any, anything else that chief? >> no, i think that complete agreement here. we all want to see the city prosper, and the clubs do well, and do the safely and responsibly. >> i think that we are working towards that goal and working closely with the entertainment in doing it. >> why don't we open it up to public comment. any member who would like to speak, please come forward. >> hello, i am stephanie grain berg and i am here representing the cpab as well as the neighbors which is a neighborhood association (inaudible) ininclusive of the troubled long troubled broad way corridor. first of all, thank you for having this hearing, i think that it is very, very important. i am here really to request or plead, if
husband john quincy adams and the complex relationship with her mother-in-law, abigail adams. we will include your questions and comments by facebook and twitter tonight. >> the republican party released a plan this morning for its approach to the next presidential election that deals with attracting minority and women voters. announced this. these comments are just under one hour. >> i appreciate that introduction. thank you for the introduction of in welcoming us to the press club. i know most of you came for eggs and coffee but thank you for staying for the speech. i want to recognize our co- chair sharon day and are treasurer tony day. day. our treasurer tony all, i you and most of want to think and how grateful i am to this opportunity project. their work cut brings us here today. i want to introduce them this morning. henry barbara of mississippi, glenn mccall of south carolina, former whitew, and house press secretary ari fleischer. when republicans lost in november, it was a wake-up call. in response, i initiated the most public and most, free handson if post election rev
member should do. of course, we have regulations to vote, to discuss laws and permits. we have a budget to control and in that budget, you will see our mobility policy. you can have your own expenses on infrastructure work, for instance, but in brussels, we also have an important policy on financing groups, social groups who are working on the issue. and i believe we should never forget to work on equity because we have those big social differences within our town. this is just shortly a slide that shows you what already has been polled, that denmark and the netherlands, they are in fact far ahead of all of the other european countries and belgium is somewhere in-between making an effort but for sure also at this trip, i have been able to learn a lot from my european colleagues in denmark and in the netherlands. brussels is in the heart of europe and i think it's also has been a very good thing that there is european regulations, although at this moment, european regulations are mainly on achieving certain environmental standards. let's say pollution by co2 and particles. but that has h
with those individuals. we abide by the open records laws, and the sunshine laws and i think in san francisco we haven't talked to the city attorney about that or your counsel about that but the open records laws and sean -- sunshine laws protect them up to appointment so we're not in a situation where every transmission of information is available to the general public. if that is the case or that becomes the case then we change the strategy around a little bit so we can help to protect the identity of the candidates, not necessarily the backgrounds, but the identity of the candidates by still abiding by those laws. >>i think one of the strengths of your team is the tremendous community involvement and searches that you done. i find it interesting to the work you did in l.a. and many nonprofits. my hope is as our diverse communities expect topnotch transportation selection processes like this that we can involve them in as many of the aspects of the profile and the competencies that we can and i welcome a number of stakeholder groups and give you the recommendations as we sit do
through the ordinance language. not once does it mention pass through. these are laws which are currently on the books and we believe the process works in our significant meetings we've had with tenant communities and with the ram port, we know there are hardship applications available for disabled and senior citizens and people who can not afford a resident increase in this nature. i know they are one of five organizations that receive funding from san francisco to help people with this process. with a we would like to do and i would like to give credit to supervisors breed for the amendment in the ordinance that there is now amendment for community outreach. this is a broad base piece of legislation which is in a 30 year plan, but to put it in this ordinance is something we need to do with significant outreach to the community, to the existing city departments that are going to be plan checking this, but to really make sure that if someone can't afford to pay for this, there are avenues that someone can take and i'm happy to have you come up to discuss the detail hardship of this proces
. >> and at least in spring through june. >> so we will actually have to adopt the change of the bi laws and we can call the meetings every month. >> i would rather keep it special meetings for may, april and, may, i think that once we get through, this, through the budget, i think that meeting at 9:30 will be appropriate. >> i don't want to go through changing the by laws. >> okay. >> that would be my preference >> thank you so much. the staff, and thank you so much to board members and if there are no further announcements are discussions the meeting is adjourned. >> -- to track stolen phones to be used in the field for other investigative purposes. that is approximately 977 dollars. >> you have a memo from the captain in your packets regarding this do nation. ironically to track cell phone thefts. is there anything you'd like to add? commissioners, questions or concerns? and is there any public comment regarding this matter. >> [inaudible] for quite a few times starting when he was the secretary for the police commission. i have a great deal of respect for him. i believe his promotion was w
, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have powerful evidence that a non-course of system can accomplish that public safety health objective
in the bail reform act of 1984, the federal law, the birth of preventative detention which one thought was clearly unconstitutional and then became a public good that changed the whole view of a system. now we live in a justice preemptive justice, but they will commit other crimes in the future. i would say if we all now agree or at least many of us agree with justice kennedy that the result has been a prison system that is barbaric that doesn't belong in a civilized society and serious atonement and i think you would recognize in the california prisons to meet that. let me say why it's a risk. it's always so reasonable to see risk as a way on out of these. i don't think i need to remind those in the room that an entire population were incarcerated for risk. nobody was held accountable for it either. if you look at the way this is a risk, you see racial class is at the end of the day the right kind of community ties and is risk reduction. professor simon, let me ask a follow-up. i want to get an idea of what a system you are advocating would look like. let's say you have arraignment f
to properly implement the laws that we have in place to protect the rights of the people involved. we have, as we noted, a bubble ordinance that has been imposed for quite sometime, and we enacted as a board last year a white zone ordinance which we offer to provide additional protections. unfortunately the laws that we've had in place have not been sufficient to protect the women, especially here. demonstrators continue to not only harass and intimidate, but they try to find loopholes in the existing laws. and what we have right now is a last resort attempt to provide some protection to the patients who want to access this clinic and to the men and women who work there. the ordinance that we have -- we are introducing creates a buffer zone, that it provides protection of 25 radius within the entrance of the clinic. it amends the bubble ordinance that was passed by this board in 1993. that bubble ordinance was a good start, but this is needed. let me say that what we are doing is something that we don't do lightly. we recognize the right of people to express free expression, to express the
national academy of elder law attorneys, local northern california chapter. i would bring new blood and new ideas, even though i'm in an old body and i would be very happy to work with [speaker not understood] people. i understand there is some interest in having a woman and a lawyer. i am both. thank you. >> thank you. any questions? seeing none, thank you very much. next person is james illig. i-l-l-i-g. i'm sorry, thank you. next person is james wagoner. >>> good afternoon. i'm a recent law school graduate. i graduated from jfk university school of law last year. and currently i'm honored to be the boardshire fellow in law and aging at bay area legal aid where i started the project for glbt senior advocacy in september and the project is basically concerned with providing legal representation and advice concerning public benefits for lgbt seniors. the project is trying to ensure that lgbt seniors do not -- low-income lgbt seniors do not disappear from our community if something goes wrong with their benefits. and so far we've had some successes and we had some challenges. but the
-span2, the fbi's top lawyer on how law-enforcement investigations are keeping up with new technology without breaking the law. that's followed by a house appropriations subcommittee looking into agriculture department spending. then "the communicators" with commissioner robert mcdowell. >> the nation's highest court is holding oral arguments this week on to gay marriage cases. the first people got in line thursday, and now the going rate for saving a seat is around $6000. a couple weeks ago director rob reiner explained why this is drawing such interest. here's a portion of what he had to say. >> one of the reasons we took on proposition eight, aside from the obvious reasons of marriage equality and we should all be treated as equal under the law and its, it was a bad initiative, and you know, the courts of our it overturned. we hope the supreme court will uphold those. those rulings. but it was partly an education process. we discover as we go along that, first of all, there's not one person in this audience, or anywhere, that doesn't have a gay person in the family or gay friend or
the full spectrum of constitutional conservativism, including life and marriage and the rule of law. [applause] on the life question. it is simple. i went through the toughest election of my life last fall. i had cameras around me from st. patrick's day to november 6. they were trying to get a second or a minute to run against me in a single ad. they did not get one second, by the way. of they are in the business try to say i did not back up any issue. we battled against life. is human life sacred in all of its forms? yes, it is. at one moment does life begin? at conception. the people on the other side of this question dare not answer either one of those question, they know they lose the debate. i stood on life and i stood on marriage. [applause] and the thing that a bunch of people are backing away from these challenge don't seem to realize, i'm still standing. [applause] why is that? i did not run a campaign on jobs in the economy, jobs in the economy, and beat that drum until i beat people into sleep. that is part of it but the rest of this has to be added together or we can nev
's law to help the seriously mentally ill we see on the streets. these folks are a danger to themselves and others and we must work with the system and put them on the pact through case management and monitoring. for two years now since i've been mayor we call this initiative for the community and it's working. this is helping people chief greater stability so this year we'll make the san francisco law calls laura's law pertinent. it's about public safety arrest despite a year where we experiences to homicides in our city san francisco remains the safest city at levels not seen since the 1960s. one homicide is too many. last year, i i was frustrated like all of you by the rash the homicides and shootings in this very community and i suggested we need to shack up our efforts for the police and communities to stop this voinsz. i regret the upheaval it started but i don't regret this today. since we launched the ipo we've seen some rules no homicides in august since the last thirty years. and homicides and gun violence down over the first part of the year citywide. thank you
lawsuits and the office of small businesses but those are federal laws not city laws so they don't impact how people bays bases them but they have been trying to advise small businesses around those issues. and the other issue i'm not familiar with what you're discussing but they are a locally owned company as well. and if it were formula retailer it would open as a regular cafe would but that has no bearing on in this case. what we know about the restaurants it's going to close at 10 o'clock it doesn't sound like a routy place so with that i'd move to approve it's conditions >> i totally agree i mean 8 o'clock closings is not relevant. >> if you've been working actually 5 or 6 o'clock and you've quota to get to your place of work you feel bad coming in at the 745 because you know they're going do close and a lot of restaurants are not serving dinner. you've got to have beer and wine because most people will want to have an alcoholic beverage with their dinner so it make sense to have a type 41 license. so i'm in favor >> call the question, please. >> on the motion to approve with con
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